2017-04-27 / Around Town

Hetland’s Passion and 'Becoming Bond'

A Spark of Creativity
By Loren King


Through his metal artworks, Timothy Hetland focuses on the fine balance and beauty of metal, wood, crystal and stone to create lasting interior and exterior sculptures. Through his metal artworks, Timothy Hetland focuses on the fine balance and beauty of metal, wood, crystal and stone to create lasting interior and exterior sculptures. Timothy Michael Hetland's metal sculptures, some muscular and industrial looking, others streamlined and intricate, are the sophisticated work of a master craftsman. But Hetland, a Rhode Island native and Middletown resident, has been creating these works of art for less than three years. And he discovered his passion almost by accident.

Metal work, which Hetland learned from his father, has always been part of his life, but his day job was installing wind turbines through his own company. A knee injury changed the course of his life. Bored following surgery, he had an “epiphany,” went to his workshop and built a codfish sculpture for his wife.

“I wondered, ‘Could I make a living doing this?’” he says. His wife urged him to “go for it” and Hetland threw himself obsessively into metal sculpture.


George Lazenby stars in a special screening of newportFILM's "Becoming Bond." George Lazenby stars in a special screening of newportFILM's "Becoming Bond." Working in high-grade metals meant to last centuries, such as aircraft aluminum, bronze, copper and stainless steel, and combining it with earth elements like hardwoods, stone and minerals, Hetland has created hundreds of handcrafted pieces. They range from the elaborate, 350-pound sphere “Moon Grate,” which took him 100 days to complete, to smaller sculptures like “Olive Tree,” made from aircraft aluminum and olive wood from Italy.

He’s not affiliated with a gallery (“I’m a rebel,” he admits) and his studio, filled with “lots of tools and chaos,” isn’t conducive to visitors. Those interested in seeing his work can go to his website, skuteundfish.com (it’s Norwegian for “small vessel and fish”), make an appointment and sift through photographs of his one-of-a-kind interior and exterior sculptures, each one reflecting something of himself.

“Everything intrigues me. I see more beauty in nature than I did 20 years ago; how a stick or a rock can be transformed,” Hetland says. “My art tells a story. It’s not just a rock with bronze on it. It’s my personal time capsule.”

'Becoming Bond'

James Bond fans and cinephiles in general won’t want to miss “Becoming Bond,” a documentary-drama about how George Lazenby, an unknown car salesman and former model from Australia, was plucked from obscurity and given the unenviable task of filling Sean Connery’s shoes as James Bond. Connery, the only Bond up to that point, decided to retire from the role after the fifth film in the Bond series, “You Only Live Twice” (1967). Lazenby became the new Bond in “On Her Majesty`s Secret Service” (1969).

But unlike Connery and all the actors who played 007 on screen over the years, from Roger Moore and Timothy Dalton to Pierce Brosnan and now Daniel Craig, the current Bond, Lazenby only lived once as James Bond.

For many critics, once was quite enough. Yet the actor, who did most of his own stunts in the film, has his champions. Some consider his lone film, which co-starred Diana Rigg and boasts a first-rate John Barry score, one of the underrated gems of the Bond franchise. Legend has it that after being offered the next seven Bond films and a million-dollar signing bonus, Lazenby turned it all down. Now 76, living in L.A. and still acting, he’s the stranger-than-fiction subject of “Becoming Bond.”

In “Becoming Bond,” Emmy-winning writer/director Josh Greenbaum traces Lazenby's story from his rough and tumble boyhood in Australia to his improbable casting as Bond even though he had no acting experience. The film is a documentary hybrid that mixes interviews with the still-charming Lazenby and dramatic reenactments. These recreated scenes star Josh Lawson as Lazenby, Adamo Palladino as director Peter Hunt, Dana Carvey as Johnny Carson and former “Bond girl” Jane Seymour as Lazenby’s agent, Maggie.

The film will hit streaming service Hulu on Saturday, May 20, but local audiences can see it on Tuesday, May 9 at Rosecliff Ballroom as part of the NewportFILM series (visit newportfilm.com for ticket information). Festivities begin at 6 p.m. with Bond-inspired cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. The film starts at 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A with Greenbaum and possibly one of the producers.

Loren King is an arts and entertainment writer whose work appears regularly in The Boston Globe and other publications. She is a past president of the Boston Society of Film Critics.

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