2015-09-10 / Nature

Sachuest Point Happenings

By Jack Kelly


Electrical workers install new solar panels at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge. (Photo by Jack Kelly) Electrical workers install new solar panels at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge. (Photo by Jack Kelly) There are some big changes underway at Sachuest Point National Wildlife Refuge. Electrical workers are installing 24 new solar panels to the existing array located just south of the Visitors’ Center. The new installation will triple the number of panels, and it is anticipated that during peak days the array will produce more than 100 percent of the power required to operate refuge buildings. The construction should be completed within the week, and is part of the renewable energy program initiated in the past decade at Sachuest Point.

The fall migration cycle has brought a number of unique avian species through the habitats of Sachuest Point. One particular migrant, a whimbrel, was first observed by local photographer and wildlife enthusiast Liz Renshaw, as the bird foraged for invertebrates in the freshly mowed southern field. The sighting attracted a number of avid birders to the refuge for a close up look at this novel traveler.


The whimbrel is a large shorebird with a wingspan of 32 inches. (Photo by Liz Renshaw) The whimbrel is a large shorebird with a wingspan of 32 inches. (Photo by Liz Renshaw) The whimbrel is a stout curlew that nests mostly on Arctic tundra in northern Alaska and western Canada. It winters on the sandy and rocky beaches, tidal mudflats, and coastal marshes of the southern Pacific and Atlantic coasts, the Gulf Coast of the United States, and Mexico, Central America and South America. It has a body length of 18 inches, and stands on long legs. Whimbrels use their long, decurved bills to probe various habitats for invertebrates.

As the migration cycle continues, Sachuest Point’s diverse habitats will continue to offer longdistance voyagers a stopover and resting refuge.



Jack Kelly, a native Newporter, is a wildlife photographer and nature enthusiast who enjoys sharing his experiences with others. Jack Kelly, a native Newporter, is a wildlife photographer and nature enthusiast who enjoys sharing his experiences with others.

Return to top