2014-07-24 / News Briefs

NEWS BRIEFS


Recently a collector brought in an unusual autograph collectible related to John C. Calhoun. Calhoun was the vice president under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson and the first to resign his office. The small cut signature included a lock of hair attached with a wax seal from Washington, dated March 3, 1849. With the seal and hair we valued this unusual collectible at between $300 and $400. Recently a collector brought in an unusual autograph collectible related to John C. Calhoun. Calhoun was the vice president under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson and the first to resign his office. The small cut signature included a lock of hair attached with a wax seal from Washington, dated March 3, 1849. With the seal and hair we valued this unusual collectible at between $300 and $400. Become a Big Brother or Big Sister

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Ocean State is continuing their drive to recruit male and female mentors for the 100+ kids who are currently on the waiting list. Boys and girls ages 7-15 throughout the state of Rhode Island are waiting to be paired with a volunteer for 6-8 hours a month for a minimum of a one year commitment. For information on how you can be a mentor contact a BBBSOS Match Support Specialist at Mentoring@ BBBSOS.org or 401-921-2434.


Six-year-olds Raegan Pawlowski and Natalia Harnett were the first week winners of Beach Idol. Beach Idol has Begun Christopher Carbone was the master of ceremonies on Thursday, July 17, for the first week of this season’s Easton’s Beach Idol competition. Eight youngsters took to the stage and sang a cappella to the audience. Raegan Pawlowski and Natalia Harnett took first place with their rendition of “Let It Go.“ Makenzie Botelho, 8, took second place. Children under 15 are invited to participate in the competition over the next four Thursday nights at Easton’s Beach. Sign-ups begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Easton’s Beach Snack Bar. Beach Idol follows the Children’s Night performances. Six-year-olds Raegan Pawlowski and Natalia Harnett were the first week winners of Beach Idol. Beach Idol has Begun Christopher Carbone was the master of ceremonies on Thursday, July 17, for the first week of this season’s Easton’s Beach Idol competition. Eight youngsters took to the stage and sang a cappella to the audience. Raegan Pawlowski and Natalia Harnett took first place with their rendition of “Let It Go.“ Makenzie Botelho, 8, took second place. Children under 15 are invited to participate in the competition over the next four Thursday nights at Easton’s Beach. Sign-ups begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Easton’s Beach Snack Bar. Beach Idol follows the Children’s Night performances. Lifeguard Training

The YMCA will offer lifeguard training on July 24, 29, and 31, from 5-8 p.m. This is a Red Cross blended learning class that has online, classroom, pool, and beach sessions. Upon completion of all segments, trainees will be certified in waterfront/ pool lifeguarding, CPR/AED PRO, first aid, and oxygen administration. Elements of the Rhode Island surf test will be included in the class. Training will finish in time for the RI DEM surf test in August. Call 401-847-9200 x108 for more information. The cost is $260 members and $285 for non-members, plus a $35 Red Cross fee.

50 Year Alum Lunch

The Rogers High School Alumni Association will hold its annual luncheon for RHS graduates who have been out for over 50 years. The luncheon will be held on Monday, 28 July at the Atlantic Beach Club in Middletown. A social hour will start at 11:45 a.m., with the luncheon served at 12:30 p.m.. The price of the luncheon is $25, choice of chicken or fish. For more information contact Colleen Murray at 401-846-4731.

Create in 3D

The Newport Public Library will host three open studio sessions as a follow up to the successful July’s Maker Camp on Wednesday, July 30, Aug. 13 and 27 from 2 -5 p.m.

These sessions are for the community at large to learn about the library’s new 3D printer, vinyl cutter, and heat press. Camp participants can also continue working on projects. All studio sessions are free.

Maker Space studios are part of a collaboration between FabNewport, Middletown Public Library, Portsmouth Free Public Library, and Newport Public Library. Funding was provided by the Rhode Island Office of Library and Information Services and the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

Casting Call

Men and women of various ages are needed for speaking parts and as extras for a short film to be shot in Newport and Providence in late August to early September. Rocco Michaluk is the director. He is working in conjunction with Summing Point and Giant Robot Productions A casting call will be held on Aug. 5 from 6 - 9 p.m. at the Firehouse Theatre. For more information, visit roccofilms.com.

Tango Weekend

A weekend of tango dancing and instruction will be held on Aug. 8 and 9 at Salve Regina University’s Pell Center, 518 Bellevue Ave. Classes will be given by Argentinian dancers and there will be live music for the dances at night. The event is being presented by the Tango Society of Boston and Providence Tango.

For more information and registration, visit providencetango.com.

Microchip Clinic

The Potter League is offering an affordable microchip clinic on Thursday, July 31, from 5 - 7 p.m. at the Potter League for Animals. The microchips will be administered by Dr. Toni Ellis, DVM, of Mobile Veterinary Routine Care. There is a $25 fee per animal payable on the day of the clinic. Call 401-846-8276 or email info@potterleague.org to pre-register.

A microchip is a tiny radio-frequency identification device and is about the size of a grain of rice. The device is implanted under the loose skin between the animal’s shoulder blades also known as the scruff. Once the microchip is in place, there is a simple registration process with the microchip manufacturer. When activated by a specialized handheld scanner, the chip emits an alphanumeric code that uniquely identifies him. Microchips are permanent and are designed to last for the life of the pet. Microchips never need to be charged or replaced and are easily injected using a specialized needle and syringe. It is quick and causes no more discomfort than a routine vaccine injection.

All cats and dogs with microchips should still wear a visible ID collar. The collar and/or tag should have the owner’s contact information as well as the microchip identification number. All stray animals that come to the Potter League are scanned upon arrival to determine if a microchip is in place.

Health Care Job Training

Newport Skills Alliance, a program of East Bay Community Action Program, in partnership with Stepping Up, will hold a Health Care Career Orientation job skills training program for Rhode Island residents beginning Sept. 15. Those who are interested in participating must attend an information session, which will be offered on Monday, July 28, from 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. and Wednesday, July 30, from 10 – 11:30 a.m. at East Bay Community Action Program, 19 Broadway. Applications for the program will be distributed at the end of each information session.

The health care training will consist of eight weeks of work readiness/soft skills, resume and interviewing preparation and a fiveweek internship at a partner health care facility. This training program prepares students for entry level health care jobs through training in CPR, first aid, bloodborne pathogens, HIPAA, core job skills, and more. Classes will meet for five and a half hours per day, five days per week, Monday through Friday. Eligible applicants must be at least 18 years of age. Cost to students is $5.

For more information, visit ebcap.org or contact Jamoya Ridgell, project manager, at 401-848-6697 x 205 or jridgell@ebcap.org, or Stacey Murak, case manager 401-848- 6697 x 209 or smurak@ebcap.org.

Newport Fire Incident Run Report

During the period from Monday,
July 14, through Sunday, July 20,
the Newport Fire Department responded to 170 calls. Of those, 84
were emergency medical calls.
Fire apparatus was used for 170
responses:
Station 1 - Headquarters/Rescue 1
and 3 responded to 55 calls
Station 1 - Engines 1 and 6
responded to 47 calls
Station 2 - Old Fort Road Rescue 2
responded to 45 calls
Station 2 - Old Fort Road Engine 2
responded to 22 calls
Station 5 - Touro Street Engines 3
and 5 responded to 37 calls

Specific situations fire apparatus
was used for include:
3-Carbon monoxide accidents
2 -Watercraft rescue
1- Trapped powerlines
1- Grass/brush fire
1- Overheated electrical motor
1-Water/steam leak
1- Excessive heat, scorch without
ignition
2- Electrical wiring/
equipment problem
4- Lockouts
4-Motor vehicle accident
2-Malicious false alarm
2- Assist NPD or other agencies
8- Assist public calls
9 - Fire alarm soundings - no fire
20- Fire alarm malfunctions - no fire
57- Engine assist on EMS call

In the category of fire prevention, the department performed 9 smoke alarm / CO inspections prior to property sales, 25 life safety / site inspections, 3 fire system plan reviews, 22 tented event reviews and inspections, and 3 acceptance tests for fire protection equipment.

FIRE PREVENTION MESSAGE:

In 2011, 70 percent of all fatal boating accident victims drowned, and of those who drowned, 84 percent were not wearing a life jacket. Always have your children wear a life jacket approved by the U.S. Coast Guard while on boats, around open bodies of water or when participating in water sports. Make sure the life jacket fits snugly. Have kids make a “touchdown” signal by raising both arms straight up; if the life jacket hits a child’s chin or ears, it may be too big or the straps may be too loose. Every child is different, so enroll your child in swimming lessons when you feel he or she is ready. Teach children how to tread water, float, and stay by the shore. Swimming in open water is not the same as swimming in a pool; kids need to be aware of uneven surfaces, river currents, ocean undertow, and changing weather. Learn more at: www.safekids.org/ tip/boating-safety-tips.

Information provided by FM Wayne Clark

Newport Police Log

During the period from Monday, July 14, to Sunday, July 20, the Newport Police Department responded to 800 calls. Of those, 138 were motor vehicle related; there were 103 motor vehicle violations issued, and 35 accident reports.

The police also responded to 29 noise complaints, 18 animal complaints, 67 home/business alarm calls, 11 private tows, 10 bicycle violations, and 9 incidents of vandalism. They also transported 5 prisoners and escorted 1 funeral.

They recorded 8 instances of assisting other police departments and 4 instances of assisting other agencies.

In addition, 34 arrests were made
for the following violations:
n 9 arrests were made for outstanding bench warrants.
n6 arrests were made for disorderly conduct.
n3 arrests were made for noise
complaints.
n2 arrests were made for possession of marijuana.
n 2 arrests were made for open
containers of alcohol.
n2 arrests were made for driving
without a license or expired license.
n1 arrest was made for domestic
felony assault.
n1 arrest was made for operating
a toy vehicle on roadway.
n1 arrest was made for violating
conditions of family court order.
n1 arrest was made for domestic
threats.
n1 arrest was made for domestic
simple assault.
n1 arrest was made for underage
drinking.
n1 arrest was made for vandalism.
n1 arrest was made for felony assault with a deadly weapon.
n1 arrest was made for fraudulent
use of a credit card.
n1 arrest was made for driving
with a suspended or revoked license. n1 arrest was made for possession
of drugs with the intent to manufacture or deliver.
n1 arrest was made for obstructing an officer.

Night Against Crime

Groups, organizations or businesses wishing to join in the Newport Police Department’s annual Night Out Against Crime should contact Gwen George at 401-845- 5714 or Officer Robert Spellman at 401-845-5862. The event will be Thursday, Aug. 14 from 4 - 6 p.m. at Easton’s Beach. Information on child identification, gun locks and bike safety will be given out.car seat inspections

Municipal Court

Judge J. Russell Jackson presided
at the Municipal Court session held
on Monday, July 21, at Newport City
Hall. The Court adjudicates cases
related to city ordinances, parking,
and traffic infractions.
There were 24 matters on the
docket:
nSeven offenses involved open
containers/drinking in public. Of
these, three defendants pleaded
no contest, each incurring costs
of $100-$400 plus court fees of
$93.50. Two cases were continued,
and two defendents that failed to
appear were issued bench warrants. nThe court heard seven noise disturbance cases, five defendants
pleaded no contest, each incurring
costs of $400-$600 plus court fees
of $93.50. Two cases were continued. nThree cases of urinating in public were called. Two cases were rescheduled; one defendent had
their record expunged.
nOf the four remaining cases violating city ordinances: one defendent plead no contest to operating a toy vehicle on a roadway and
was fined $200 plus $93.50 court
fees, another individual was fined
$400 for operating a prohibited air
gun, one case of public urination
was continued, and one case was
closed regarding an individual who
was operating a bicycle without a
license.
nFour cases were heard regarding
traffic violations: Three drivers had
their cases continued and one who
failed to obey a traffic light had
their case dismissed due to a good
driving record.
nTwo matters of multiple parking
violations were continued.

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