2014-07-24 / Around Town

Preservation Honorees Announced


Seaweed, one of the three Doris Duke Historic Preservation Awards recipients, as seen in the early 1900s. Seaweed, one of the three Doris Duke Historic Preservation Awards recipients, as seen in the early 1900s. The Doris Duke Historic Preservation Awards is a joint project of the Newport Restoration Foundation (NRF) and the City of Newport to celebrate achievements in local historic preservation. The eighth annual awards will recognize three projects and their contributions to Newport’s historic landscape and commitment to preservation.

The award winners were chosen by a committee comprised of representatives from NRF, the City of Newport, and individuals involved in historic preservation at the local and state levels, including Robert Foley, Director of Preservation, Newport Restoration Foundation; Thomas Goddard, Vice President, NRF Board of Trustees; Naomi Neville, Newport City Council Neville Architecture & Environmental Consulting; John Shehan, Vice Chair, Historic District Commission; Diana Sylvaria, Chair, Historic District Commission; and Sarah Zurier, R.I. Historic Preservation & Heritage Commission. Winners will be publicly recognized on Aug. 27 at Newport City Hall.


Cliffside Inn (c. 1876) is one of the preservation award recipients. Cliffside Inn (c. 1876) is one of the preservation award recipients. This year’s honorees are The Newport Tree Society/The Newport Arboretum for its citywide heritage horticulture restoration projects and community education Bill and Nancy Bagwill for Cliffside Inn (c. 1876), a meticulously restored inn that conveys a clear affection for historic architecture and interiors; and Holly Bannister and Douglas Newhouse for Seaweed (c. 1860 and c.1902), which took a purist preservation approach.

“Cliffside Inn initially caught our eye because of the attention paid to its landscape design, which accentuates the historic front fa├žade,” said Naomi Neville. “Rebuilding the canopy entry at Seaweed brings the architecture into the landscape. The Tree Society's dedication to preserving Newport's landscape accentuates not only our historic structures but and adds a level of living historical fabric oto every neighborhood.”

“Jointly, the three projects exemplify the importance of landscape's integration into the historical fabric as it acts as the weave between our beautiful, unique historical structures,” continued Neville. Newport is fortunate that the early builders understood landscapes' importance, and the city we celebrate today is a full amalgamation of historical architecture, natural landscape, and historical manmade landscape.”

All proceeds from the awards celebration on Sept. 5 at Rough Point will benefit the Doris Duke Fund for Historic Preservation, which distributes grants to civic and non-profit organizations on Aquidneck Island and Jamestown. Administered by the NRF, these grants are generally given for bricks-and-mortar projects or project planning. The funds from the 2013 awards celebration benefited projects by: Chevra Kadisha Association of Newport County, City of Newport, Star of the Sea, LaFarge Restoration Fund and St. Columba’s Chapel.

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