2013-10-31 / From The Garden

Seaside Garden Club Meeting


Seaside Garden Club members prepared flower arrangements for the Edward King House cocktail party fundraiser held on Oct. 26. Back row: Pat Callahan, Laura Murphy,Betty Shea, Pat Olechnowicz, Maryellen Kane. Front Row: Joan Kerwin, Lorraine McLeishDiningand LindaatHammer.The Chanler Seaside Garden Club members prepared flower arrangements for the Edward King House cocktail party fundraiser held on Oct. 26. Back row: Pat Callahan, Laura Murphy,Betty Shea, Pat Olechnowicz, Maryellen Kane. Front Row: Joan Kerwin, Lorraine McLeishDiningand LindaatHammer.The Chanler The Seaside Garden Club of Newport will hold its next meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 6 p.m. at the Vasco Da Gama Hall on Fenner Avenue. The guest speaker will be Richard Ho of Rich Original Floral. He will present ideas for arrangements for the upcoming holidays. Refreshments will be served.

For more information, call Lorraine McLeish at 401-847-7914.

RESTAURANTS

and via social networks, including Newport Restaurant Week’s Facebook page and on Discover Newport’s Twitter feed (handle: @ DSCVRNewport, use #nptrw). Also, diners from Providence and around the state can rely on Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA) bus routes with $4 per round trip tickets or $6 for an all-day pass to save money and think green.

Newport Restaurant Week was established in 2006 as an annual event to encourage both residents and visitors to Newport and Bristol counties to experience the vast culinary talent in our destination at an affordable price. The event’s mission is to stimulate local business not only at restaurants but at retail and lodging partners as well. In 2008, Newport Restaurant Week expanded to a biannual event; one taking place in early spring and the other in late fall. Restaurateurs often create menus that celebrate seasonal ingredients and promote local food and wine purveyors. Many offer vegetarian and glutenfree alternatives to patrons with food allergies or special dietary requirements. Newport Restaurant Week is brought to you by Discover Newport, American Express, Uppercut Sauvignon Blanc, Terrazas Malbec, Samuel Adams and OpenTable.com.

Autumn’s Cornucopia

“Cornucopia” is a word meaning “inexhaustible store” and was first used in 1508. It is wonderfully symbolic of the upcoming holidays. The first symbol of a cornucopia was a ram’s horn filled with vegetables, colorful leaves, and flowers, then placed on a table. It represented abundance of the autumn harvest. Today, a horn shaped basket filled with Indian corn, squashes, gourds, and of course, apples, makes for a lovely table centerpiece.

— Cynthia Gibson

The majority of the daffodil bulbs planted for the Daffodillion project have been “King Alfreds” a strong, tall, and large long-cupped bright yellow variety. King Alfred is one of the oldest and best types of daffodils available. This is a terrific project to get behind. Next spring the “golden glow” of effort from all the daffodillions will be shining! For more information, visit Daffodillion.com.

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